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Fox DHX2 - Setup Guide

Basics

Here are a few basics about spring-rate, sag and parameters that determine the spring rate you need.

  • The rate of the spring you use in your DHX2 shock defines the amount of sag.
  • Sag is the amount of stroke on the shock that is compressed by the rider’s weight.
  • A higher spring rate will result in less sag.

Defining your spring rate

Defining the spring rate that fits you, depends on a few factors.

  • The spring rate depends on the design of the suspension. The same rider will need different spring rates on different bikes. You cannot simply transfer the spring rate from bike A to bike B.
  • The spring rate mainly depends on the rider’s weight. The weight should include all gear you wear.
  • Your riding style also influences the spring rate that fits you best. Choosing a firmer spring (higher rate) will result in less sag, which means:
    • You will effectively use less travel
    • The geometry of the bike will be a bit more ‘up-right’, with a little higher BB
    • The chance to bottom out is smaller
  • Choosing a softer spring (lower rate) will result in more sag, which means:
    • You will effectively use more travel
    • The geometry of the bike will be a bit more ‘slack’, with a little lower BB
    • The chance to bottom out is bigger

The compression damping and the rebound damping are also very important in setting up the shock correctly. If for example you are a racer and have a very aggressive/ efficient riding style, you might want to go up in spring rate, but you can also play with the high speed and low speed compression.

It is recommendable to have a few different spring rates in your toolbox. This way you can change your sag depending on the gear you wear, the type of terrain you ride and simply how you feel.

These are spring rates we recommend, with a basic setting for the four damping settings. The number of clicks is counted from fully closed.

Rider's weight (KG) Spring Rate (lbs/in) HSC LSC HSR LSR
57 - 63 Rocker 60 400 12 16 0 14
64 - 70 Rocker 60 450 11 15 0 13
71 - 77 Rocker 60 500 10 14 0 12
78 - 84 Rocker 60 550 9 14 0 11
85 - 91 Rocker 60 600 8 13 0 10
88 - 94 Rocker 65 500 10 14 0 12
95 - 101 Rocker 65 550 9 14 0 11
102 - 108 Rocker 65 600 8 13 0 10
109 - 114 Rocker 65 650 7 13 0 9

HSC – High Speed Compression

Large impacts hitting the rear wheel fast are absorbed by the spring and can be slow down by the high-speed compression damping. Adding HSC damping will slow down the suspension when being compressed by a large impact.

LSC – Low Speed Compression

Small impacts hitting the rear wheel are absorbed by the spring and can be slow down by the low-speed compression damping. With no LSC damping, the spring will be able to absorb every little impact and track the ground very precisely. By adding LSC, you can make your suspension use less travel on small impacts, which can make the suspension a bit calmer on small impacts. You can also add LSC to make the suspension move less by the movements of your body when pedaling. The ‘2-position lever’ is a lever adding a large amount of LSC for more efficient pedaling.

HSR & LSR – High Speed Rebound & Low Speed Rebound

The rebound damping defines how fast the suspension extends after absorbing an impact. More rebound damping means that the suspension extends slower. If it extends too slow, it might not be ready for the next impact. A compressed shock is holding the energy from the impact, so if your rebound is too fast, you will get the energy right back to your feet, making the bike hard to control.

The difference between HSR and LSR is not as clear to feel as the difference between HSC and LSC. We recommend to fully close the HSR and play with the LSR. Only if the LSR is fully open and still too slow, you can open up the HSR. There are different approaches to set up the LSR and HSR.

Fox Float X2 - Setup Guide

Basics

Here are a few basics about sag and the parameters that determine the air pressure you need.

  • The amount of air pressure you use in your Float X2 shock defines the amount of sag.
  • Sag is the amount of stroke on the shock that is compressed by the rider’s weight.
  • More air pressure will result in less sag.

Defining the air pressure

Defining the air pressure that fits you, depends on a few factors.

  • The air pressure depends on the design of the suspension. The same rider will need different air pressure on different bikes. You cannot simply transfer the air pressure from bike A to bike B.
  • The air pressure mainly depends on the rider’s weight. The weight should include all gear you wear.
  • Your riding style also influences the air pressure that fits you best. Adding air pressure will result in less sag, which means:
    • You will effectively use less travel
    • The geometry of the bike will be a bit more ‘up-right’, with a little higher BB
    • The chance to bottom out is smaller
  • Reducing the air pressure will result in more sag, which means:
    • You will effectively use more travel
    • The geometry of the bike will be a bit more ‘slack’, with a little lower BB
    • The chance to bottom out is bigger

The compression damping and the rebound damping are also very important in setting up the shock correctly. If for example you are a racer and have a very aggressive/ efficient riding style, you might want to go up in air pressure, but you can also play with the high speed and low speed compression.

Setting up the right amount of air pressure works best with measuring sag, but here is a list of estimated pressure-values as a starting point. This table also shows the basic setting for the four damping settings. The number of clicks is counted from fully closed.

Rider's weight (KG) Air Pressure (psi) HSC LSC HSR LSR
63 Rocker 60 170 12 16 0 14
70 Rocker 60 190 11 15 0 13
77 Rocker 60 210 10 14 0 12
84 Rocker 60 230 9 14 0 11
91 Rocker 60 245 8 13 0 10
94 Rocker 65 235 9 14 0 11
101 Rocker 65 255 8 13 0 9
108 Rocker 65 275 7 13 0 9
114 Rocker 65 295 6 12 0 8

HSC – High Speed Compression

Large impacts hitting the rear wheel fast are absorbed by the spring and can be slow down by the high-speed compression damping. Adding HSC damping will slow down the suspension when being compressed by a large impact.

LSC – Low Speed Compression

Small impacts hitting the rear wheel are absorbed by the spring and can be slow down by the low-speed compression damping. With no LSC damping, the spring will be able to absorb every little impact and track the ground very precisely. By adding LSC, you can make your suspension use less travel on small impacts, which can make the suspension a bit calmer on small impacts. You can also add LSC to make the suspension move less by the movements of your body when pedaling. The ‘2-position lever’ is a lever adding a large amount of LSC for more efficient pedaling.

HSR & LSR – High Speed Rebound & Low Speed Rebound

The rebound damping defines how fast the suspension extends after absorbing an impact. More rebound damping means that the suspension extends slower. If it extends too slow, it might not be ready for the next impact. A compressed shock is holding the energy from the impact, so if your rebound is too fast, you will get the energy right back to your feet, making the bike hard to control.

The difference between HSR and LSR is not as clear to feel as the difference between HSC and LSC. We recommend to fully close the HSR and play with the LSR. Only if the LSR is fully open and still too slow, you can open up the HSR. There are different approaches to set up the LSR and HSR.

Fox DPX2 - Setup Guide

Basics

Here are a few basics about sag and the parameters that determine the air pressure you need.

  • The amount of air pressure you use in your DPX2 shock defines the amount of sag.
  • Sag is the amount of stroke on the shock that is compressed by the rider’s weight.
  • More air pressure will result in less sag.

Defining the air pressure

Defining the air pressure that fits you, depends on a few factors.

  • The air pressure depends on the design of the suspension. The same rider will need different air pressure on different bikes. You cannot simply transfer the air pressure from bike A to bike B.
  • The air pressure mainly depends on the rider’s weight. The weight should include all gear you wear.
  • Your riding style also influences the air pressure that fits you best. Adding air pressure will result in less sag, which means:
    • You will effectively use less travel
    • The geometry of the bike will be a bit more ‘up-right’, with a little higher BB
    • The chance to bottom out is smaller
  • Reducing the air pressure will result in more sag, which means:
    • You will effectively use more travel
    • The geometry of the bike will be a bit more ‘slack’, with a little lower BB
    • The chance to bottom out is bigger

The compression damping and the rebound damping are also very important in setting up the shock correctly. If for example you are a racer and have a very aggressive/ efficient riding style, you might want to go up in air pressure, but you can also play with the compression.

Setting up the right amount of air pressure works best with measuring sag, but here is a list of estimated pressure-values as a starting point. This table also shows the basic setting for the rebound and the low-speed-compression. The number of clicks is counted from fully closed.

Rider's weight (KG) Air Pressure (psi) LSC Rebound
63 Rocker 60 190 10 12
70 Rocker 60 210 9 11
77 Rocker 60 230 8 10
84 Rocker 60 245 7 9
91 Rocker 60 265 6 8
94 Rocker 65 255 6 8
101 Rocker 65 275 5 7
108 Rocker 65 295 4 6
114 Rocker 65 315 3 5
Rocker 60 & Rocker 65

The suspension of the Madonna V2 is designed around two different rocker links, the Rocker 60 and the Rocker 65. Both rocker links generate 160mm of travel at the rear wheel, each with just over 20% of progression. But the differentiating factor is the shock stroke. The Rocker 60 uses 60mm of stroke on the shock to generate 160mm of travel at the rear wheel. The Rocker 65 uses 65mm of stroke to produce the 160mm of travel. This results in a higher leverage ratio for the Rocker 60 that is best suited for riders up to 90kg and a lower leverage ratio for the Rocker 65 that is best for riders over 90kg.

Riders on the lighter end of the scale benefit from the Rocker 60 with more mechanical leverage that helps the damping and adds to the small bump sensitivity. The Rocker 65 enables heavier riders to run a lower air pressure or spring rate and happy damping for the shock.

The different stroke lengths on the shock are fixed internally but based around the same shock. A 205 x 60 shock can be modified to 205 x 65 and vice versa. But this needs to be done directly by FOX.

Torque Setting & Assembly Details

All frame bolts including the brake mount bolts need to be tightened to 12 Nm. The main pivot nut needs to be tightened to 50 Nm. Make sure to use a thread-locker in medium strength for the brake mount bolts. All frame bolts should be assembled with grease on the thread and contact surfaces.

Creak Troubleshoot

Having a quiet bike is something I’m obsessed with. The only thing I want to hear is the sound of the tires, suspension and, depending on its presence, the sound of the mechanics in my rear hub.

But there are many sounds that can ruin my after-work ride. A few weeks ago, I managed to start my ride five times, because some little noise bothered me too much and I kept coming back. Tightening the BB cup on the drive-side turned out to be the solution.

I hope not everyone is as obsessed with having a quiet bike, but I do think a world with quiet bikes is a better world. There are many details on the Madonna that help in achieving this. One being the cable routing that bypasses the internal mysteries. Others being the design of the pivots, the threaded BB and the shape of the chain stays. But the reality is that there remains plenty of sources for unwanted little creaky noises.

First of all, it is good to understand that noises will always come from two surfaces that are in contact. With specific forces on the two surfaces it will start rubbing and generate noise. So, the general solution is to grease contact surfaces and tighten the connection. Now that is very theoretical. The more practical solution is to follow the list down below if you happen to have a creaky noise on your bike. These are the most common sources from my experience.

Rear Wheel Axle

The axle through the rear wheel can loosen up sometimes. Take it out, grease it and tighten it up to at least 15 Nm, but not red-face-tight.

Bottom Bracket

This one won’t be loud, but if one of the cups isn’t tightened properly it’s a common source for little noises. The best solution is to disassemble, clean, grease and re-assemble it. But I would recommend to first try and tighten the cups up and see if that is the cause of your unwanted noise.

Headset

This one is tricky, as there can be many sources of noises from the front-end of your bike. But there is one trick that helped me already a few times.

The Acros headset has a plastic ring that sits on top of the top headset bearing. This plastic ring can be a source of noises (mainly while pedaling, which can be confusing!). Simply clean the plastic ring, grease it a little and assemble it all properly. Now, like I said, there can be many reasons for noises from the front of the bike, but this specific solution helped me out a few times already.

Main Pivot & Rocker Pivot

From all the experience gathered in the past two years there can be two sources of noise from the frame itself. Other than the rider screaming with joy.

The main pivot and rocker pivot have large contact surfaces that can get noisy if they are dry and not tightened properly. Getting both out is very straight forward, as well as re-assembling them. Give it all a good clean, grease all contact surfaces properly and tighten them to the correct torque setting. 12 Nm for the rocker pivot and 50 Nm for the main pivot. After this, they’ll be quiet for a very long time.

Other sources

Those are the five most common sources of creaky noises. But of course, there can be other reasons. In the end it can literally be anything on the bike. I’d recommend to always make one change at a time, this way you’ll know what the reason was. And if you need help, feel free to send me a message.

User Manual Download

Madonna V1 User Manual (PDF)

Madonna V2 User Manual (PDF)

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